Stream Fishing For Trout

Frustration and time, when it comes to trout fishing, seems to be the common buzzword.Good news, there are some simple trout fishing tips that may turn your next fishing trip into success! The more experienced anglers may catch a trout or two, and they think they are lucky, which more times than not, is the [...]

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BAROMETRIC CONDITIONS

by Fly Fisherman

Weather and barometric conditions as well as the time of day influence both the places in a stream where you will find trout and what the fish will be doing. In most cases none of these things influence the fish in a trout stream as much as the water temperatures, the stage of the water, [...]

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SMOOTH SWIFT WATER TACTICS

by Fly Fisherman

Often a smooth stretch of swift water will be found sweeping silently along at the head of a piece of white water. The fish in this smooth, swift water are liable to be big ones which cern able to see the angler rather far off. Use a long line, md a fairly long leader—about 12 [...]

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FISHING RIFFLES

by Fly Fisherman

FISHING RIFFLES About 75% of all fish food in a trout stream is in the riffles or series of small rapids and rocky pockets common to all good trout rivers and creeks. This water is always of the broken current variety—in Western streams is often white-water. At first glance these rapids may seem like just [...]

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ALDER BUSH TACTICS

by Fly Fisherman

While you were fishing out the right hand side of the current tongue at the head of the pool, three trout have started to feed close to some alder bushes across the river near the left hand bank, where the current has swung in close to shore. It is too deep to wade there; anyway, [...]

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FISHING CURRENT TONGUES

by Fly Fisherman

Let’s suppose you are fishing a pool with a tongue of current at the head, coming down from a riffle above. The temperature is in the 60°-66° range, so a dry fly is logical. The current is medium fast, so the trout below the riffle can see only five or six feet in the water, [...]

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How Far Can a Trout See??

by Fly Fisherman

It is important to study the flow and roughness of the water for another reason. In fast, broken-current water a trout can see underwater only three or four feet. In clear, quiet water he may see things under water that are twenty-five to thirty-five feet away, depending upon how deep he is swimming. This fact [...]

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FISHING THE RISE & Water

by Fly Fisherman

Dry fly fishing is done in two main ways. The first h to fish the rise. This means you watch the stream to locate a trout that is feeding on natural insects on the surface. When you’ve found your feeding trout you carefully plan how best to cast to him—and put on a small scale [...]

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DRY FLY FISHING

by Fly Fisherman

I like dry fly fishing more than any form of angling I have ever known. It takes good and accurate casting. If you’ve read my suggestions on fly casting and done some practicing on them, you’ll be able to successfully use a dry fly to catch trout. And will you enjoy it! A dry fly [...]

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Water between 60° and 68° F. is the ideal dry fly range for trout. At these temperatures aquatic insects hatch from the nymph, larva and pupa stage more readily than at any other. Trout are comfortable at these temperatures and they range avidly to their feeding grounds—the “dining rooms” mentioned before. Feeding trout are usually [...]

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When your stream thermometer registers a temperature between 55° and 60° F., and the water is clear and not in flood stage, you can begin to use a dry fly. Brown trout, which feed more often on the surface than Brooks and Rainbows, will take dry flies freely in this temperature. Rainbows and Brooks will [...]

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BUSHY STREAMS

by Fly Fisherman

BUSHY STREAMS Bucktails and streamers are well adapted to the method of fishing downstream in very bushy conditions by letting your line drift down the current and then retrieving with a wiggle-and-jerk technique. If you get your fly caught on a bush or grass near the water or on a log or rock, try getting [...]

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Night Fishing Bucktails and streamers, which imitate minnows both in looks and action, are especially good for night fishing, as that is the time big trout do most of their minnow feeding. If you really want big trout, you should learn and use night fishing methods. The first requisite is to know your water thoroughly. [...]

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Where to Find Big Trout

by Fly Fisherman

Because the trout you are hunting are large it is better to use a fairly heavy leader—never under 1X at the tip—and a .010 inch diameter is sometimes better. Ordinarily a 7 ft. to 9 ft. leader is good, especially if the water is murky; but in very clear water and with scary trout you [...]

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FISHING A WEIGHTED FLY

by Fly Fisherman

You will once in a while strike some place where your wet fly won’t sink fast enough to reach a place where a good trout should be. In that case use a split shot on your leader. Never use a sinker unless your fly just won’t go down in fast water quick enough. Usually in [...]

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DAPPING A WET FLY

by Fly Fisherman

There is a special method of fishing small, deep pools where it is possible to get your rod directly over the deepest water without the fish in the pool seeing you. This situation turns up fairly often in rocky canyons in Western streams and occasionally in Eastern and Middle Western trout streams. Often there is [...]

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FISHING A NYMPH

by Fly Fisherman

Sometimes, usually in water well above 55° F., you will see trout in shallow water with their heads close to the bottom and their tails making quiet little swirls at or near the surface. These fish are hunting for nymphs or larvae on the rocks of the bottom. Fishermen call this process “tailing.” A nymph, [...]

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STRIKING IN WET FLY FISHING

by Fly Fisherman

In wet fly fishing, especially by the natural drift method, you must be alert to strike quickly—firmly but not too hard—at the first feel of a fish or at the slightest move of the line in any direction other than a natural drift with the current. In fishing a wet fly downstream by the action [...]

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FAVORITE FOOD OF BROWN TROUT

by Fly Fisherman

FAVORITE FOOD OF BROWN TROUT Brown trout like the same three kinds of aquatic insects—mayflies, caddisflies and true-flies—and in the same order; but the Browns take about 80 percent of their food from mayfly nymphs and adult mayflies. This is twice the Rainbow percentage and four times the Brook trout percent for mayflies. Brown trout [...]

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Calendar of Insect Hatches

by Fly Fisherman

The transitions of these aquatic insects from nymphs or larvae to adults—or the coming up through the water of the nymphs and larvae to get ready for the adult stage—is called a hatch. This is the time when trout feed most heavily on aquatic insects and is the best time for fly fishing. Certainly it [...]

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Trout Stream Insects From the standpoint of imitating the trout’s most important food, wet flies lead all other artificials. This is because aquatic insects in their underwater, or non-flying, stages constitute by far the largest portions of the food of all stream trout. This is true for Brook trout, Brown trout, Rainbows, Cutthroats and Dolly [...]

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In our study of trout stream conditions from the standpoint of a fish, we now come to the 50° to 55° F. range. This is where wet flies are the preferred method of fishing for trout. By wet flies I mean a fly fished underneath the surface of the water. This includes, besides regular wet [...]

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Striking With Live Bait

by Fly Fisherman

If you get a strike when fishing with live bait, do not try to set the hook right away. Let the trout take the bait in his mouth and start to make a run with it. Then strike by firmly raising the tip of the rod and tightening the line. Do not give a great [...]

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NATURAL PRESENTATION OF FLY

by Fly Fisherman

Another thing that is important in stream fishing for trout, salmon or bass, is that your fly or bait should come to the fish in as nearly a natural manner as possible. There is another characteristic of fish, as of other wild life, however, that is also important in attracting a fish to your fly [...]

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LIVE BAIT FISHING FOR TROUT

by Fly Fisherman

LIVE BAIT FISHING FOR TROUT You can take trout with a wet fly, nymph or bucktail, especially in water above 40°, and I’ll tell you just how to do it later on. Just now though, let’s see what is the best way to use the lowly but very fish-taking angle worm or minnow in conditions [...]

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